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Drywall Art

Beautifying Manhattan, Kansas and surrounding area with Drywall Art.

How did we do that???
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Before you begin ... on the Dining Room
In the beginning...

 

My brother Jerry and his wife Sandy wanted to make their dining room more appealing and romantic. They had decorated the room very nicely but it just wasn't what they wanted. Sandy likes beamed ceiling and Jerry likes reflected indirect lighting. After a lot of discussion, they decided they did not want the traditional stained, dark wood beams but rather something that would make the room look bigger and welcoming. They decided on beams that would accommodate 2 1/2" crown molding and a convex outside corner trim for the lower edge of the beams. All the sections would be recessed and the center section would be lower than the beams (where the chandelier would be mounted) in order to project the light outward and downward past the section lines. If the section were recessed, the light would hit the beams and not be reflected outwards.

The Plan...always good to have one!

The beams use the following Trim-Tex moldings and materials:
Material cost for the beams is approximately $3.00 per linear foot.

The wall/ceiling beams use the following Trim-Tex moldings and materials:
Material cost for the wall/ceiling area is approximately $4.00 per linear foot.

Jerry and Sandy chose the beams and the wall/ceiling sizes and layout to fit their likes. Without saying, you should make the the room the way you want it.
Step 1 - Infrastructure
Given that we know what we want, we need to lay out the room and build any infrastructure required. In this case, we built the beams out of 2 x 4s and secured them to the ceiling to form the sections. The electrical for the center light was re-worked in order to accommodate the lowering of the light fixture. You might notice that the perimeter beams are wider than the beams in the center of the room. We are intending to use large crown molding around the perimeter and have a layer of drywall on the existing wall to help make the room look bigger. If any existing infrastructure were in the way of our adventure, we would need to accommodate them, ie. maybe a smoke detector, door bell, etc.

Step 2 - Drywall Installation
After the infrastructure is in place, all surfaces need to be covered with drywall in preparation for applying the trim. Given that we are going to use crown molding in the interior of the beams, we need to run the drywall up to the original ceiling. The trim that we are going to use to cover the edges of the beams needs the drywall held back from the edge for it to fit properly. If we cover the entire beam we will only have to go back and cut the drywall back to allow for the trim. SO, it is easier to just to put up what is needed. As you can see the center section is completely covered and ran a layer of drywall on the exisitng wall below the perimiter beams. We use Trim-tex 847 spray glue and drywall laminating screws when we layer he drywall. We have tried spray glue from several large home improvement stores but the Trim-tex glue works the best, just our opinion.

Step 3 - Trim Installation
After the drywall is applied, we are ready to apply the trim. We use Trim-Tex products and have had great success. We used Trim-tex 3 3/4" Crown Molding - 6312 around the perimeter walls, 2 1/2" Crown - 6110 inside each beamed section, Niche Bead 641 - 64110 on the edges of the beams, and L bead - 35040 for the rest. Another reason to have a layer of drywall below the crown on the existing walls is to keep from have to paint the existing wall. The 3 1/2" crown needs to be stapled/glued along the bottom to secure it to the wall. We apply Trim-tex spray glue 847 spray glue and Trim-tex 700 adhesive caulk to the crown then staple with 1/4" x 3/4" in a pneumatic stapler. Once it is installed, the mounting area needs to be taped and mudded. By adding the additional layer of drywall, an L bead can be applied. The L Bead touches the existing wall so the existing wall is not damaged. The crown molding mounting area is facing downward. The L Bead mounting area is facing upward so only the area between the two trims need to be taped and mudded. As we applied the trim, we decided to add another layer of drywall to the center section. Jerry and Sandy like art deco so we made an art deco pattern on the added center section. You might notice the blue tape on the walls. Since we are not going to repaint the existing wall, we covered everything in plastic. In new construction, we would not have to take these pre-cautions.
Step 4 - Drywall Taping
Ok, so we have all the drywall install and have all the Trim-tex trim installed, we are ready for the messy part. We use mesh tape on the nail tabs and paper tape on all the drywall joints. We only want to do this once and it may be going overboard, BUT, we don't want cracks. For the first coat, the taper usually uses all purpose mud on the paper work and lightweight mud on the mesh. For the second and third coats, lightweight is used.

Step 5 - Painting
Finished!!!
Once the drywall finish work is completed, a primer coats of paint is applied. Spraying is the best, roller and brush will do. Any knicks or scratches in the finish work need to be touched up before a final coat is applied. You may have seen in some of the pictures on this web site, a texturing process that is usually referred to a knock-down finish. this process has drywall mud sprayed onto the area and then a trowel is used to knock-down the high points of the sprayed on mud. If we were doing to apply know-down, it would be after the primer coat of paint and before the finish coat of paint. Here in the dining room, we did not do a knock-down finish.

Moving on to the Foyer
The way it was...

 

While we were working at my brother's house, Jerry and Sandy decided to gussy up the foyer. They wanted the foyer to be more welcoming and illusion of a higher ceiling. Adding beams like we did in the dining room would actually make the foyer look smaller and pull the ceiling down.

Step 1 - Infrastructure
In the Foyer, we only had to be concerned about a smoke detector. Given our plan, we only had to extend the electrical box in order to accommodate our drywall art.

Step 2 - Drywall Installation
In the foyer, we decided to use the same 3 3/4" crown molding and the same L Bead. So, just like we did in the dining room, we put a layer of drywall extending below the crown molding to avoid having to re-paint the existing walls. To make the room look a little taller, we add layers of drywall on the ceiling extending out from under the crown molding. Each of the layers would have a pattern, in this case, art deco.

Step 3 - Trim Installation
The trim installation in the foyer was pretty straight forward. Because of the long straight runs of trim, we first installed the crown molding in the entire foyer. Once the crown was in place we measured off the crown and snapped lines where the exposed edge of the L Bead would be installed. When you walk into a room, your eye will detect any variances in spacing or curvatures in the trim.

We used the following Trim-Tex moldings and materials in the foyer:
Material cost for the wall/ceiling area is approximately $2.00 per linear foot.
Step 4 - Drywall Taping
Ok, so we have all the drywall install and have all the Trim-tex trim installed, we are ready for the messy part. We use mesh tape on the nail tabs and paper tape on all the drywall joints. We only want to do this once and it may be going overboard, BUT, we don't want cracks. For the first coat, the taper usually uses regular taping mud on the paper work and lightweight on the mesh. for the second and third coats, lightweight is used.

Step 5 - Painting
nce the drywall finish work is completed, a primer coats of paint is applied. Spraying is the best, roller and brush will do. Any knicks or scratches in the finish work need to be touched up before a final coat is applied. You may have seen in some of the pictures on this web site, a texturing process that is usually referred to a knock-down finish. this process has drywall mud sprayed onto the area and then a trowel is used to knock-down the high points of the sprayed on mud. If we were doing to apply know-down, it would be after the primer coat of paint and before the finish coat of paint. Here in the dining room, we did not do a knock-down finish.

Finished!!!
Stuff you need to get started
In summary, you need the following tools:
  • tape measures, squares, levels, chalk line, etc.
  • ladders, scaffolding, etc.
  • drywall cutting tools
  • miter saw
  • pneumatic stapler
Materials:
  • masking tape, plastic, etc. for work in existing home
  • drywall
  • drywall taping supplies
  • Trim-tex moldings
  • Trim-tex glue and caulking
  • primer paint
  • finish color(s) paint
AND mostly an imagination!
OK, One last thought...
This is pretty easy to do, if I can do it, YOU can do it! In this example, we had figured out that we wanted a circle pattern on the half wall. So, rather than try to do it sitting on the floor, we decided to do it on a set of saw horses. We cut the drywall to the overall size need for the half wall. We marked off the area that would be covered with base trim and centered our pattern on the remaining area. We then drew out the desired pattern. We used a hand jig saw to cut out the pattern. The Trim-tex Product Catalog provides specs on each product. The product we choose 3299 flexable molding (I only had a picture of the non-flex version of the trim L bead - 3299) has a bending radius that would work for our pattern. We used L bead - 35040 to cover the straight cuts. We cut the trim and used 847 spray glue and stapled it onto the drywall. Once the design was complete, we glued and used laminating screws to attach it to the half wall. The taper did a nice job taping it!



TrimTex 847 Spray Glue

L Bead 3299
Use a piece of 1/2" wood to hold trim for the cut.

Paper Tape
MeshTape
All Purpose Mud
Light Weight Mud
Drywall Laminating Screws

Niche Bead Style 641
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Use an "L" shaped piece of wood to hold trim for the cut.

2 1/2" Crown Molding
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Use foam block to hold trim for the cut.

Niche Bead Style 641
mouse over to zoom
Use an "L" shaped piece of wood to hold trim for the cut.

2 1/2" Crown Molding
mouse over to zoom
Use foam block to hold trim for the cut.

3 3/4" Crown Molding - 6312
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Use foam block to maintain profile while cutting.

Double 1/2" Decorative L Bead Style 651
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Use two pieces of 1/2" wood to hold trim for the cut.

3 3/4" Crown Molding - 6312
mouse over to zoom
Use foam block to maintain profile while cutting.

2 1/2" Crown Molding
mouse over to zoom
Use foam block to hold trim for the cut.

Niche Bead Style 641
mouse over to zoom
Use an "L" shaped piece of wood to hold trim for the cut.

350 Bull L Bead - 35040
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Use a 1/2" piece of wood to hold trim for the cut.

700 Adhesive Caulk
350 Bull L Bead - 35040
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Use a 1/2" piece of wood to hold trim for the cut.

3 3/4" Crown Molding - 6312
mouse over to zoom
Use foam block to maintain profile while cutting.

3 3/4" Crown Molding - 6312
mouse over to zoom
Use foam block to maintain profile while cutting.

Chamfer Stop - 9530
mouse over to zoom
Use a 1/2" piece of wood to hold trim for the cut.

350 Bull L Bead - 35040
mouse over to zoom
Use a 1/2" piece of wood to hold trim for the cut.

Double 1/2" Decorative L Bead Style 651 - 65110
mouse over to zoom
Use two 1/2" pieces of wood to hold trim for the cut.

Decorative L Bead Style 691 - 69105
mouse over to zoom
Use a 1/2" piece of wood to hold trim for the cut.

Chamfer Stop - 9530
mouse over to zoom
Use a 1/2" piece of wood to hold trim for the cut.

350 Bull L Bead - 35040
mouse over to zoom
Use a 1/2" piece of wood to hold trim for the cut.

Decorative L Bead Style 691 - 69105
mouse over to zoom
Use a 1/2" piece of wood to hold trim for the cut.

3 3/4" Crown Molding - 6312
mouse over to zoom
Use foam block to maintain profile while cutting.

Crown Molding with light channel - 6450
mouse over to zoom
Use foam block to maintain profile while cutting.

350 Bull L Bead - 35040
mouse over to zoom
Use a 1/2" piece of wood to hold trim for the cut.

Double 1/2" Decorative L Bead Style 651
mouse over to zoom
Use two pieces of 1/2" wood to hold trim for the cut.

2 1/2" Crown Molding
mouse over to zoom
Use foam block to hold trim for the cut.

3/4" R. Step Bull - 7040
mouse over to zoom
Use piece of wood to hold trim for the cut.

350 Bull L Bead - 35040
mouse over to zoom
Use a 1/2" piece of wood to hold trim for the cut.

2 1/2" Crown Molding
mouse over to zoom
Use foam block to hold trim for the cut.

3/4" R. Step Bull - 7040
mouse over to zoom
Use piece of wood to hold trim for the cut.